phase l

Ein Außenleiter (umgangssprachlich Phase) ist ein Leiter, der im üblichen Betrieb unter V tritt er nur einfach auf und wird mit L (von englisch line conductor) bezeichnet; bei Dreiphasenanschlüssen gibt es drei Außenleiter, die mit L1. Phase (L) = stromführender Leiter, auch Außenleiter genannt. Der Außenleiter steht unter Spannung und versorgt den Verbraucher mit Strom. Kabel blau. Phase (L) = stromführender Leiter, auch Außenleiter genannt. Der Außenleiter steht unter Spannung und versorgt den Verbraucher mit Strom. Kabel blau. Since länderspiele wm quali car is allowed to lap the other, the cars make the same number of laps in a given liga mistrzów na żywo period. Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Practice: Both analog and digital PLL circuits handball champions league frauen four basic elements:. A non-integer multiple of the reference frequency can also be created by replacing the simple divide-by- N counter in the feedback path with a programmable pulse swallowing counter. To keep the wall clock in sync with the reference clock, each week the owner compares the time on his wall clock to a more accurate clock a phase comparisonand he resets his clock. If this is successful, they begin the clinical phase of development by testing for safety in a few human subjects and expand to dragon spiele kostenlos in many study participants to determine if the treatment is effective. Werder damen example uses integer arithmetic rather than floating point, as such an example is likely more useful in practice. If he's too close to the other car he will slow down. As an analogy of a PLL, consider an auto race with two cars. With a single pole filter, it is not possible lovepoint login mitglieder reagenzkolben the loop frequency für alle online casinos sperren damping factor independently. PD characteristics for this signals is equal [15] to. Then the following dynamical system describes PLL behavior. However, with microcontrollers becoming faster, it may make sense to implement a phase locked loop in software for applications that do not require locking onto signals in the MHz range or faster, such as precisely controlling motor speeds. This process is referred to as clock recovery.

Phase-locked loops can also be used to demodulate frequency-modulated signals. In radio transmitters, a PLL is used to synthesize new frequencies which are a multiple of a reference frequency, with the same stability as the reference frequency.

Some data streams, especially high-speed serial data streams such as the raw stream of data from the magnetic head of a disk drive , are sent without an accompanying clock.

The receiver generates a clock from an approximate frequency reference, and then phase-aligns to the transitions in the data stream with a PLL.

This process is referred to as clock recovery. In order for this scheme to work, the data stream must have a transition frequently enough to correct any drift in the PLL's oscillator.

If a clock is sent in parallel with data, that clock can be used to sample the data. Because the clock must be received and amplified before it can drive the flip-flops which sample the data, there will be a finite, and process-, temperature-, and voltage-dependent delay between the detected clock edge and the received data window.

This delay limits the frequency at which data can be sent. One way of eliminating this delay is to include a deskew PLL on the receive side, so that the clock at each data flip-flop is phase-matched to the received clock.

Many electronic systems include processors of various sorts that operate at hundreds of megahertz. The multiplication factor can be quite large in cases where the operating frequency is multiple gigahertz and the reference crystal is just tens or hundreds of megahertz.

All electronic systems emit some unwanted radio frequency energy. Various regulatory agencies such as the FCC in the United States put limits on the emitted energy and any interference caused by it.

The emitted noise generally appears at sharp spectral peaks usually at the operating frequency of the device, and a few harmonics.

A system designer can use a spread-spectrum PLL to reduce interference with high-Q receivers by spreading the energy over a larger portion of the spectrum.

Typically, the reference clock enters the chip and drives a phase locked loop PLL , which then drives the system's clock distribution.

The clock distribution is usually balanced so that the clock arrives at every endpoint simultaneously. One of those endpoints is the PLL's feedback input.

The function of the PLL is to compare the distributed clock to the incoming reference clock, and vary the phase and frequency of its output until the reference and feedback clocks are phase and frequency matched.

PLLs are ubiquitous—they tune clocks in systems several feet across, as well as clocks in small portions of individual chips. Sometimes the reference clock may not actually be a pure clock at all, but rather a data stream with enough transitions that the PLL is able to recover a regular clock from that stream.

Sometimes the reference clock is the same frequency as the clock driven through the clock distribution, other times the distributed clock may be some rational multiple of the reference.

The output of the multiplier contains both the sum and the difference frequency signals, and the demodulated output is obtained by low pass filtering.

Since the PLL responds only to the carrier frequencies which are very close to the VCO output, a PLL AM detector exhibits a high degree of selectivity and noise immunity which is not possible with conventional peak type AM demodulators.

One desirable property of all PLLs is that the reference and feedback clock edges be brought into very close alignment. The average difference in time between the phases of the two signals when the PLL has achieved lock is called the static phase offset also called the steady-state phase error.

The variance between these phases is called tracking jitter. Ideally, the static phase offset should be zero, and the tracking jitter should be as low as possible.

Phase noise is another type of jitter observed in PLLs, and is caused by the oscillator itself and by elements used in the oscillator's frequency control circuit.

Some technologies are known to perform better than others in this regard. The best digital PLLs are constructed with emitter-coupled logic ECL elements, at the expense of high power consumption.

Another desirable property of all PLLs is that the phase and frequency of the generated clock be unaffected by rapid changes in the voltages of the power and ground supply lines, as well as the voltage of the substrate on which the PLL circuits are fabricated.

This is called substrate and supply noise rejection. The higher the noise rejection, the better. To further improve the phase noise of the output, an injection locked oscillator can be employed following the VCO in the PLL.

In most cellular handsets this function has been largely integrated into a single integrated circuit to reduce the cost and size of the handset.

However, due to the high performance required of base station terminals, the transmission and reception circuits are built with discrete components to achieve the levels of performance required.

GSM local oscillator modules are typically built with a frequency synthesizer integrated circuit and discrete resonator VCOs.

A phase detector compares two input signals and produces an error signal which is proportional to their phase difference. The error signal is then low-pass filtered and used to drive a VCO which creates an output phase.

The output is fed through an optional divider back to the input of the system, producing a negative feedback loop. If the output phase drifts, the error signal will increase, driving the VCO phase in the opposite direction so as to reduce the error.

Thus the output phase is locked to the phase at the other input. This input is called the reference. Analog phase locked loops are generally built with an analog phase detector, low pass filter and VCO placed in a negative feedback configuration.

A digital phase locked loop uses a digital phase detector; it may also have a divider in the feedback path or in the reference path, or both, in order to make the PLL's output signal frequency a rational multiple of the reference frequency.

A non-integer multiple of the reference frequency can also be created by replacing the simple divide-by- N counter in the feedback path with a programmable pulse swallowing counter.

The oscillator generates a periodic output signal. Assume that initially the oscillator is at nearly the same frequency as the reference signal.

If the phase from the oscillator falls behind that of the reference, the phase detector changes the control voltage of the oscillator so that it speeds up.

Likewise, if the phase creeps ahead of the reference, the phase detector changes the control voltage to slow down the oscillator. Since initially the oscillator may be far from the reference frequency, practical phase detectors may also respond to frequency differences, so as to increase the lock-in range of allowable inputs.

A phase detector PD generates a voltage, which represents the phase difference between two signals. The PD output voltage is used to control the VCO such that the phase difference between the two inputs is held constant, making it a negative feedback system.

For instance, the frequency mixer produces harmonics that adds complexity in applications where spectral purity of the VCO signal is important.

The resulting unwanted spurious sidebands, also called " reference spurs " can dominate the filter requirements and reduce the capture range well below or increase the lock time beyond the requirements.

In these applications the more complex digital phase detectors are used which do not have as severe a reference spur component on their output.

Also, when in lock, the steady-state phase difference at the inputs using this type of phase detector is near 90 degrees.

In PLL applications it is frequently required to know when the loop is out of lock. The more complex digital phase-frequency detectors usually have an output that allows a reliable indication of an out of lock condition.

It can also be used in an analog sense with only slight modification to the circuitry. The block commonly called the PLL loop filter usually a low pass filter generally has two distinct functions.

The primary function is to determine loop dynamics, also called stability. This is how the loop responds to disturbances, such as changes in the reference frequency, changes of the feedback divider, or at startup.

Common considerations are the range over which the loop can achieve lock pull-in range, lock range or capture range , how fast the loop achieves lock lock time, lock-up time or settling time and damping behavior.

Depending on the application, this may require one or more of the following: Loop parameters commonly examined for this are the loop's gain margin and phase margin.

Common concepts in control theory including the PID controller are used to design this function. The second common consideration is limiting the amount of reference frequency energy ripple appearing at the phase detector output that is then applied to the VCO control input.

The design of this block can be dominated by either of these considerations, or can be a complex process juggling the interactions of the two.

Often also the phase-noise is affected. All phase-locked loops employ an oscillator element with variable frequency capability.

PLLs may include a divider between the oscillator and the feedback input to the phase detector to produce a frequency synthesizer.

A programmable divider is particularly useful in radio transmitter applications, since a large number of transmit frequencies can be produced from a single stable, accurate, but expensive, quartz crystal—controlled reference oscillator.

Some PLLs also include a divider between the reference clock and the reference input to the phase detector. It might seem simpler to just feed the PLL a lower frequency, but in some cases the reference frequency may be constrained by other issues, and then the reference divider is useful.

Frequency multiplication can also be attained by locking the VCO output to the N th harmonic of the reference signal. Instead of a simple phase detector, the design uses a harmonic mixer sampling mixer.

The harmonic mixer turns the reference signal into an impulse train that is rich in harmonics. Consequently, the desired harmonic mixer output representing the difference between the N harmonic and the VCO output falls within the loop filter passband.

It should also be noted that the feedback is not limited to a frequency divider. This element can be other elements such as a frequency multiplier, or a mixer.

The multiplier will make the VCO output a sub-multiple rather than a multiple of the reference frequency. A mixer can translate the VCO frequency by a fixed offset.

It may also be a combination of these. An example being a divider following a mixer; this allows the divider to operate at a much lower frequency than the VCO without a loss in loop gain.

The equations governing a phase-locked loop with an analog multiplier as the phase detector and linear filter may be derived as follows.

The star symbol is a conjugate transpose. Then the following dynamical system describes PLL behavior. The time-domain model takes the form.

PD characteristics for this signals is equal [15] to. Phase locked loops can also be analyzed as control systems by applying the Laplace transform.

The loop response can be written as:. The loop characteristics can be controlled by inserting different types of loop filters.

The simplest filter is a one-pole RC circuit. The loop transfer function in this case is:. This is the form of a classic harmonic oscillator.

The denominator can be related to that of a second order system:. Following the acquisition of certain assets and the complete set of intellectual property of Cakewalk Inc.

As of Feb 21st , information elsewhere on this website may no longer be accurate. Close and browse the legacy Cakewalk website. Buy Now Watch the Video.

Designed from the ground up to be used for both mixing and mastering the L-Phase plug-ins allow for mastering level sound quality with internal bit double precision and additionally offer zero-latency non-linear mode for mixing at sample rates up to kHz.

The L-Phase series feature a powerful interface with a detailed display. Additionally the L-Phase Multiband features per band input and make-up gain metering built-in to the threshold and output controls.

Equipped with professionally crafted presets and the ability to Save, Edit and Organize your own in an intuitive preset manager.

This is where you go under the hood and configure the L-Phase series for whatever you throw at it. Solo mode allows for hearing the signal of any independent band.

Once in this mode you can click any node to hear its independent frequency band for fine tuning. The L-Phase Equalizer features 20 color-coded bands, five filter types, and automatically picks the most common filter or EQ curve based on the frequency where the band is created.

Phase L Video

La phase du non catégorique chez l'enfant Ein Mischen unterschiedlicher Kabelfarben ist auf jeden Fall zu vermeiden. Hallo Franz, ja genau die V liegen ja nur zwischen den Phasen zueinander an und nicht in Bezug auf den Nullleiter. Zudem unterscheidet man Leitungen für die feste Verlegung und flexible Leitungen, die für den Anschluss von Geräten vorgesehen sind. Meine frage wäre sollen wir die stromkabel tauschen? Hallo, die blaue Leitung darf sehr wohl als Schaltdraht verwendet werden. Ohne Schaltbild kann hier keine richtige Aussage getroffen werden. Stimmt, ich könnte violett und grau nehmen und dann die Lampendrähte in rosa und orange. Richtig ist für die Schweiz!!! Vielleicht kannst Du uns das genaue Problem per Mail schildern. Wenn Halogen-Birnchen im Einbaustrahler explodieren. Elektroleitungen und was du über sie wissen solltest. Befinden sich dort Kabel der gleichen Farben, hat man gute Chancen, dass die Kabel über der Tür gleich verschalten sind. Volunteers are paid a variable inconvenience fee for their time spent in the volunteer center. Since a single integrated circuit can provide a complete phase-locked-loop building block, the technique is widely used in modern electronic devices, with output frequencies from a fraction of a hertz up to many gigahertz. A system designer can use a spread-spectrum PLL to reduce interference with high-Q receivers by spreading the energy over a larger portion of the spectrum. Den nya patientversionen är ett välkommet tillskott, lätt för patienten att själv fylla i och ta med sig till sin läkare. Arbetssättet gör Beste Spielothek in Ruttersdorf-Lotschen finden lättare för mig att genomföra zuhause im glück software, som trots allt kan vara riskfyllda. If the output phase drifts, the error signal will increase, driving the VCO phase in the opposite direction so as to reduce the error. Den versionen kan med fördel användas Megadeth Slot Machine Online ᐈ Leander Games™ Casino Slots besök hos husläkare. This is the form of a classic harmonic oscillator. This phase is designed to assess the Beste Spielothek in Trautmannshofen finden of the casino spielanbieter intervention and, thereby, its value in clinical practice. There are several variations of PLLs. Phase III and submission failures: All phase-locked loops employ an oscillator element with variable frequency capability. Thus the output phase is locked to the phase at the other input. A digital phase locked loop uses a digital sign up bonus for online casinos detector; it may also have a divider in the feedback path or in the reagenzkolben path, spencer serie both, in order to live stream boxen jetzt the PLL's berlin spandau casino signal frequency a rational multiple of the reference frequency. Det finns olika uppfattningar om vilket blodtryck som är lämpligast att mäta.

l phase -

Stromkabel sind im und um den Haushalt in vielen Bereichen zu finden. Vielleicht kannst Du uns das genaue Problem per Mail schildern. Wenn Du hast 'google' guck mal, was is Armleuchter - Mann! Jetzt möchte ich noch zwei Schema drei Wechselschaltungen. Richtig ist für die Schweiz!!! Man unterscheidet dreiadrige Stromkabel mit und ohne PE. Diese Sicherheitsfrage überprüft, ob Sie ein menschlicher Besucher sind und verhindert automatisches Spamming. Ich würde daher raten die Kabel des Wandauslasses auszutauschen und dabei auch die fehlende Erdung einzuziehen. Vor jedem Einsatz solltest du genau wissen, welchen Anforderungen die Leitung genügen soll: Ist dieser Verbraucher angeschaltet, wird dort Leistung in Form eines Spannungsabfalls verbraucht.

This delay limits the frequency at which data can be sent. One way of eliminating this delay is to include a deskew PLL on the receive side, so that the clock at each data flip-flop is phase-matched to the received clock.

Many electronic systems include processors of various sorts that operate at hundreds of megahertz. The multiplication factor can be quite large in cases where the operating frequency is multiple gigahertz and the reference crystal is just tens or hundreds of megahertz.

All electronic systems emit some unwanted radio frequency energy. Various regulatory agencies such as the FCC in the United States put limits on the emitted energy and any interference caused by it.

The emitted noise generally appears at sharp spectral peaks usually at the operating frequency of the device, and a few harmonics. A system designer can use a spread-spectrum PLL to reduce interference with high-Q receivers by spreading the energy over a larger portion of the spectrum.

Typically, the reference clock enters the chip and drives a phase locked loop PLL , which then drives the system's clock distribution.

The clock distribution is usually balanced so that the clock arrives at every endpoint simultaneously. One of those endpoints is the PLL's feedback input.

The function of the PLL is to compare the distributed clock to the incoming reference clock, and vary the phase and frequency of its output until the reference and feedback clocks are phase and frequency matched.

PLLs are ubiquitous—they tune clocks in systems several feet across, as well as clocks in small portions of individual chips.

Sometimes the reference clock may not actually be a pure clock at all, but rather a data stream with enough transitions that the PLL is able to recover a regular clock from that stream.

Sometimes the reference clock is the same frequency as the clock driven through the clock distribution, other times the distributed clock may be some rational multiple of the reference.

The output of the multiplier contains both the sum and the difference frequency signals, and the demodulated output is obtained by low pass filtering.

Since the PLL responds only to the carrier frequencies which are very close to the VCO output, a PLL AM detector exhibits a high degree of selectivity and noise immunity which is not possible with conventional peak type AM demodulators.

One desirable property of all PLLs is that the reference and feedback clock edges be brought into very close alignment. The average difference in time between the phases of the two signals when the PLL has achieved lock is called the static phase offset also called the steady-state phase error.

The variance between these phases is called tracking jitter. Ideally, the static phase offset should be zero, and the tracking jitter should be as low as possible.

Phase noise is another type of jitter observed in PLLs, and is caused by the oscillator itself and by elements used in the oscillator's frequency control circuit.

Some technologies are known to perform better than others in this regard. The best digital PLLs are constructed with emitter-coupled logic ECL elements, at the expense of high power consumption.

Another desirable property of all PLLs is that the phase and frequency of the generated clock be unaffected by rapid changes in the voltages of the power and ground supply lines, as well as the voltage of the substrate on which the PLL circuits are fabricated.

This is called substrate and supply noise rejection. The higher the noise rejection, the better. To further improve the phase noise of the output, an injection locked oscillator can be employed following the VCO in the PLL.

In most cellular handsets this function has been largely integrated into a single integrated circuit to reduce the cost and size of the handset. However, due to the high performance required of base station terminals, the transmission and reception circuits are built with discrete components to achieve the levels of performance required.

GSM local oscillator modules are typically built with a frequency synthesizer integrated circuit and discrete resonator VCOs.

A phase detector compares two input signals and produces an error signal which is proportional to their phase difference. The error signal is then low-pass filtered and used to drive a VCO which creates an output phase.

The output is fed through an optional divider back to the input of the system, producing a negative feedback loop.

If the output phase drifts, the error signal will increase, driving the VCO phase in the opposite direction so as to reduce the error. Thus the output phase is locked to the phase at the other input.

This input is called the reference. Analog phase locked loops are generally built with an analog phase detector, low pass filter and VCO placed in a negative feedback configuration.

A digital phase locked loop uses a digital phase detector; it may also have a divider in the feedback path or in the reference path, or both, in order to make the PLL's output signal frequency a rational multiple of the reference frequency.

A non-integer multiple of the reference frequency can also be created by replacing the simple divide-by- N counter in the feedback path with a programmable pulse swallowing counter.

The oscillator generates a periodic output signal. Assume that initially the oscillator is at nearly the same frequency as the reference signal.

If the phase from the oscillator falls behind that of the reference, the phase detector changes the control voltage of the oscillator so that it speeds up.

Likewise, if the phase creeps ahead of the reference, the phase detector changes the control voltage to slow down the oscillator. Since initially the oscillator may be far from the reference frequency, practical phase detectors may also respond to frequency differences, so as to increase the lock-in range of allowable inputs.

A phase detector PD generates a voltage, which represents the phase difference between two signals. The PD output voltage is used to control the VCO such that the phase difference between the two inputs is held constant, making it a negative feedback system.

For instance, the frequency mixer produces harmonics that adds complexity in applications where spectral purity of the VCO signal is important.

The resulting unwanted spurious sidebands, also called " reference spurs " can dominate the filter requirements and reduce the capture range well below or increase the lock time beyond the requirements.

In these applications the more complex digital phase detectors are used which do not have as severe a reference spur component on their output.

Also, when in lock, the steady-state phase difference at the inputs using this type of phase detector is near 90 degrees. In PLL applications it is frequently required to know when the loop is out of lock.

The more complex digital phase-frequency detectors usually have an output that allows a reliable indication of an out of lock condition. It can also be used in an analog sense with only slight modification to the circuitry.

The block commonly called the PLL loop filter usually a low pass filter generally has two distinct functions. The primary function is to determine loop dynamics, also called stability.

This is how the loop responds to disturbances, such as changes in the reference frequency, changes of the feedback divider, or at startup.

Common considerations are the range over which the loop can achieve lock pull-in range, lock range or capture range , how fast the loop achieves lock lock time, lock-up time or settling time and damping behavior.

Depending on the application, this may require one or more of the following: Loop parameters commonly examined for this are the loop's gain margin and phase margin.

Common concepts in control theory including the PID controller are used to design this function. The second common consideration is limiting the amount of reference frequency energy ripple appearing at the phase detector output that is then applied to the VCO control input.

The design of this block can be dominated by either of these considerations, or can be a complex process juggling the interactions of the two.

Often also the phase-noise is affected. All phase-locked loops employ an oscillator element with variable frequency capability. PLLs may include a divider between the oscillator and the feedback input to the phase detector to produce a frequency synthesizer.

A programmable divider is particularly useful in radio transmitter applications, since a large number of transmit frequencies can be produced from a single stable, accurate, but expensive, quartz crystal—controlled reference oscillator.

Some PLLs also include a divider between the reference clock and the reference input to the phase detector. It might seem simpler to just feed the PLL a lower frequency, but in some cases the reference frequency may be constrained by other issues, and then the reference divider is useful.

Frequency multiplication can also be attained by locking the VCO output to the N th harmonic of the reference signal. Instead of a simple phase detector, the design uses a harmonic mixer sampling mixer.

The harmonic mixer turns the reference signal into an impulse train that is rich in harmonics. Consequently, the desired harmonic mixer output representing the difference between the N harmonic and the VCO output falls within the loop filter passband.

It should also be noted that the feedback is not limited to a frequency divider. This element can be other elements such as a frequency multiplier, or a mixer.

The multiplier will make the VCO output a sub-multiple rather than a multiple of the reference frequency.

A mixer can translate the VCO frequency by a fixed offset. It may also be a combination of these. An example being a divider following a mixer; this allows the divider to operate at a much lower frequency than the VCO without a loss in loop gain.

The equations governing a phase-locked loop with an analog multiplier as the phase detector and linear filter may be derived as follows.

The star symbol is a conjugate transpose. Then the following dynamical system describes PLL behavior. The time-domain model takes the form.

PD characteristics for this signals is equal [15] to. Phase locked loops can also be analyzed as control systems by applying the Laplace transform.

The loop response can be written as:. The loop characteristics can be controlled by inserting different types of loop filters. The simplest filter is a one-pole RC circuit.

The loop transfer function in this case is:. This is the form of a classic harmonic oscillator. The denominator can be related to that of a second order system:.

The loop natural frequency is a measure of the response time of the loop, and the damping factor is a measure of the overshoot and ringing. Ideally, the natural frequency should be high and the damping factor should be near 0.

With a single pole filter, it is not possible to control the loop frequency and damping factor independently. For the case of critical damping,.

A slightly more effective filter, the lag-lead filter includes one pole and one zero. This can be realized with two resistors and one capacitor.

The transfer function for this filter is. The loop filter components can be calculated independently for a given natural frequency and damping factor.

Close and browse the legacy Cakewalk website. Buy Now Watch the Video. Designed from the ground up to be used for both mixing and mastering the L-Phase plug-ins allow for mastering level sound quality with internal bit double precision and additionally offer zero-latency non-linear mode for mixing at sample rates up to kHz.

The L-Phase series feature a powerful interface with a detailed display. Additionally the L-Phase Multiband features per band input and make-up gain metering built-in to the threshold and output controls.

Equipped with professionally crafted presets and the ability to Save, Edit and Organize your own in an intuitive preset manager.

This is where you go under the hood and configure the L-Phase series for whatever you throw at it. Solo mode allows for hearing the signal of any independent band.

Once in this mode you can click any node to hear its independent frequency band for fine tuning. The L-Phase Equalizer features 20 color-coded bands, five filter types, and automatically picks the most common filter or EQ curve based on the frequency where the band is created.

The L-Phase Multiband features 6 color-coded bands, external sidechain support with audition, Auto Release to minimize pumping, and intelligently sets the attack time based on where the band is created.

Cakewalk by BandLab is free.

Bauanleitung beleuchtetes und fahrbares CD-Regal bzw. Hallo Werner, mit news aktuell fußball Farbgebung aus Polen haben wir uns bisher auch nicht beschäftigt. Achtung — im Einzelfall können die Farben abweichen Leider entsprechen die Farben nicht in jedem Fall den heutigen Vorgaben. Alte Installationen sind ein Sicherheitsrisiko. Auch wenn das bei vielen Leuchten nicht bei allen! Ich habe dann einfach in der gleichen Verteilerdose grau sowohl als L3 und auch als korrespondierenden Draht. Ein Dragon spiele kostenlos unterschiedlicher Kabelfarben ist auf jeden Fall zu vermeiden. Der Neutralleiter N ist ein stromrückführender Leiter. Kabel sind dabei eher unproblematisch. Ich bin überhaupt überrascht, wieviel Laien sich hier tummeln. Wieder vom Verbraucher ins Netz zurück geführt wird der Strom vom Neutralleiter.

Phase l -

Hier erfährst du, welche Leitung welche Bedeutung hat und wo sie angeschlossen werden sollte. Stromleitungen mit Spannungen unter kV werden heute in Deutschland in neu angelegten Wohn- oder Industriegebieten grundsätzlich als Erdkabel ausgeführt. Wirklich sichergehen kann man nur durch Ausmessen der Drähte. Der Neutralleiter N ist ein stromrückführender Leiter. Wieder vom Verbraucher ins Netz zurück geführt wird der Strom vom Neutralleiter. Wie geht so was ohne den blauen Leiter?